Parent-Child Report for Jean Mendel

Prepared June 12, 2018

OCA2 Gene Region
influences eye color

Allele Types:
  • Light
  • Dark
 Influence Light Eye Color
Allele Pair People with this allele pair normally have light eyes, typically blue or green.
Rosalind
 Influence Dark Eye Color
Allele Pair People with these allele pairs normally have dark eyes, typically brown.

Gregor, Jean

Inheritance & Origins

Light (European)

Jean inherited one "Light" allele of OCA2 from Rosalind. This allele originates from an ancient European mutation that occurred thousands of years ago.

Dark (Global)

Jean inherited one "Dark" allele of OCA2 from Gregor. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

Did You Know?

OCA2 is a major influence on eye color. It produces melanin, a pigment that affects the color of your eyes. People with more melanin in the iris have darker eyes, whereas those with less melanin have lighter eyes.
Blue, green, and grey eyes are lighter and contain less melanin. Hazel eyes are in the middle of the dark-light spectrum. Brown eyes have higher concentrations of melanin. Certain mutations in OCA2 lead to albinism, of which one trait is blue eyes.
African and Asian populations typically have alleles for darker eyes, whereas alleles for lighter eyes are more prevalent in European populations. According to one study, the mutation for light eyes occurred in Europe 6,000 to 10,000 years ago.
A common misconception is that only one gene controls eye color. In fact, other genes also influence this trait, including TYRP1, ASIP, and ALC42A5.
Since OCA2 is the primary genetic influence on eye color and there are no common environmental factors impacting this trait, Gene Heritage has labeled OCA2 a MAJOR influence. OCA2 also has a minor to moderate influence on skin color and hair tone.
...

How OCA2 Works

OCA2 contains instructions for a protein in specialized cells of the iris that produce melanin. These cells are known as melanocytes. Within each melanocyte are compartments called melanosomes that store and transport melanin.
Variation in eye color is related to both the number of melanosomes in your eyes as well as the concentration of melanin within each melanosome. If you have darker eyes, you probably have more melanosomes and melanin, whereas if you have lighter eyes you likely have less of both.
Adjacent to OCA2 on chromosome 15 is the HERC2 gene, which interacts with OCA2 to influence eye color. The OCA2 gene region includes both OCA2 and HERC2. People with blue eyes almost all share a common mutation on HERC2.
...

ABCC11 Gene
influences skin glands that produce armpit odor & earwax

Allele Types:
  • Dry
  • Wet
 Influence Dry-type Earwax
 Influence Less Armpit Odor
Allele Pair People with this allele pair have dry, flaky earwax. They tend to have less armpit odor than those with one or two "Wet" alleles.

 Influence Wet-type Earwax
 Influence More Armpit Odor
Allele Pair People with these allele pairs have moist, brownish earwax. While they tend to have more armpit odor than those with two "Dry" alleles, many other factors influence this trait, especially personal hygiene.
Gregor
Jean, Rosalind

Inheritance & Origins

Dry (Asian)

Jean inherited one "Dry" allele of ABCC11 from Rosalind. This allele originates from an ancient Asian mutation that occurred thousands of years ago.

Wet (Global)

Jean inherited one "Wet" allele of ABCC11 from Gregor. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

Did You Know?

Although the connection between earwax-type and armpit odor is hard to see at first glance, both traits are controlled by specialized skin glands influenced by ABCC11.
The “Dry” allele is more prevalent in Asia. According to one study, the mutation for the “Dry” allele first appeared around 40,000 years ago in Northeast Asia, then spread to other parts of the continent. The “Dry” allele is most common in Korea, China, Mongolia, and western Japan.
The “Wet” allele is most common in African and European populations.
Many non-genetic factors influence armpit odor, especially personal hygiene.
...

How ABCC11 Works

Earwax-type and armpit odor are both produced by specialized skin glands that differ from the majority of other glands. ABCC11 encodes a protein involved in apocrine secretion in these specialized glands. In the case of body odor (or “osmidrosis” for those looking to boost their vocabulary), armpits excrete chemical compounds that interact with microorganisms on the skin.
Earwax (or “cerumen”) aids in the cleaning and lubrication of ear canals. It also provides some protection against bacteria, fungi, insects, and water.
...

TAS2R38 Gene
influences taste sensitivity to PTC, PROP, & similar bitter chemicals in vegetables

Allele Types:
  • Insensitive
  • Semi-sensitive
  • Sensitive
 Influence PTC & PROP Have No Taste
 Influence Broccoli Tastes Less Bitter
Allele Pair Most people with this allele pair do not taste the chemicals PTC and PROP. Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli probably taste slightly less bitter to people with these allele pairs.

 Influence PTC & PROP Taste Bitter
Allele Pair Most people with these allele pairs taste the chemicals PTC/PROP as slightly bitter.

Rosalind
 Influence PTC & PROP Taste Very Bitter
 Influence Broccoli Tastes More Bitter
Allele Pair Most people with these allele pairs taste the chemicals PTC/PROP as very bitter. Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli probably taste slightly more bitter to people with these allele pairs. Since vegetables contain many substances, their bitterness may be masked and hard to perceive.

Jean
Gregor

Inheritance & Origins

Insensitive (Global)

Jean did not inherit any "Insensitive" alleles of TAS2R38. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

Semi-sensitive (African)

Jean inherited one "Semi-sensitive" allele of TAS2R38 from Rosalind. This allele originates from an ancient African mutation that occurred thousands of years ago.

Sensitive (Global)

Jean inherited one "Sensitive" allele of TAS2R38 from Gregor. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

Did You Know?

TAS2R38 influences your sensitivity to bitterness in certain naturally occurring chemicals in cruciferous vegetables, such as Brussels sprouts and broccoli. PTC and PROP are both synthetics that taste similarly bitter to these chemicals.
Since PTC and PROP come in pure chemical form, they’re easier to taste and TAS2R38’s influence on perceiving them has been labelled MAJOR by Gene Heritage.
...

How TAS2R38 Works

TAS2R38 encodes instructions for building one of the more than 20 different types of bitterness taste receptors in the taste buds of your tongue. The ability to taste bitterness likely helped our ancestors avoid toxic foods.
For a fun experiment, order taste strips to test your sensitivity to PTC and PROP.
...

TAS2R31 Gene
influences bitterness sensitivity to saccharin

Allele Types:
  • Insensitive
  • Sensitive
 Influence Saccharin Less Bitter
Allele Pair People with this allele pair tend to taste saccharin as less bitter than those with one or two “Sensitive” alleles.
Gregor
 Influence Saccharin More Bitter
Allele Pair People with these allele pairs usually taste saccharin as more bitter that those with two “Insensitive” alleles.
Rosalind
Jean

Inheritance & Origins

Insensitive (Global)

Jean inherited one "Insensitive" allele of TAS2R31 from Gregor. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

Sensitive (Global)

Jean inherited one "Sensitive" allele of TAS2R31 from Rosalind. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

Did You Know?

The TAS2R31 gene region influences bitter taste sensitivity to saccharin, an artificial sweetener used in drinks, candies, and medicines. It’s a primary ingredient in Sweet ‘N Low. The TAS2R31 region also influences sensitivity to caffeine and quinine, as well as a chemical found in artichokes.
People who find saccharin bitter tend to have a similar taste reaction to acesulfame potassium, another artificial sweetener.
...

How TAS2R31 Works

TAS2R31 and the adjacent TAS2R43 and TAS2R46 genes encode instructions for building three of the more than 20 different types of bitterness taste receptors in the taste buds of your tongue. All three genes tend to be inherited together.
The ability to taste bitterness likely helped our ancestors avoid toxic foods.
...

OR5A1 Gene
influences sensitivity to floral odorants of β-ionone, rose oil & violets

Allele Types:
  • Insensitive
  • Sensitive
 Influence Hardly Smells β-ionone
 Influence Violets & Rose Oil Less Fragrant
Allele Pair People with this allele pair are less sensitive to floral odorants of β-ionone than those with one or two "Sensitive" alleles. They tend to perceive violets and rose oil as less floral and fragrant than those with one or two "Sensitive" alleles.

 Influence Easily Smells β-ionone
 Influence Violets & Rose Oil More Fragrant
Allele Pair People with these allele pairs are more sensitive to floral odorants of β-ionone than those with two "Insensitive" alleles. They tend to perceive violets and rose oil as more floral and fragrant than those with two "Insensitive" alleles.
Gregor, Jean
Rosalind

Inheritance & Origins

Insensitive (Global)

Jean did not inherit any "Insensitive" alleles of OR5A1. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

Sensitive (Global)

Jean has two "Sensitive" alleles of OR5A1, one from Rosalind and one from Gregor. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

Did You Know?

OR5A1 is a major influence on smell sensitivity to beta-ionone (β‑ionone), a compound found in violets and roses. It’s also found in various foods, beverages, and personal and household care products. Rose oil contains beta-ionone and is used in perfumery and other applications to provide a floral scent. Beta-ionone is perceived as “fragrant”, “floral”, “aromatic”, or “perfume-like”.
If you're sensitive to beta-ionone, you may have a different emotional response to it than someone who's insensitive. Just because you're sensitive doesn't mean you'll necessarily either like or dislike its smell.
For a fun experiment, purchase a smell kit to test your sensitivity to various scents.
...

How OR5A1 Works

The human nose contains hundreds of olfactory receptors that perceive a wide range of smells. OR5A1 encodes a specific olfactory receptor that interacts with the odorant molecules of beta-ionone (β‑ionone) to trigger perception of this compound. It also triggers the perception of other chemicals similar to beta-ionone.
OR5A1 is one of about 1000 genes in the olfactory gene family, although only several hundred of these actually encode for various smells. The olfactory gene family is the largest known family of genes. While most of these genes have a minor to moderate influence on perceiving smells, Gene Heritage has labelled OR5A1 a MAJOR influence on smell sensitivity to beta-ionone based on the findings of various scientific studies.
...

OR7D4 Gene
influences smell sensitivity to masculine odorants in a human pheromone

Allele Types:
  • Sensitive
  • Insensitive
 Influence Easily Smells Androstadienone
Allele Pair People with this allele pair tend to be more sensitive to masculine odorants in androstadienone, a human pheromone, than those with two "Insensitive" alleles. They tend to find its smell strong and unpleasant.

 Influence Smells Androstadienone
Allele Pair People with this allele pair tend to have smell sensitivity to masculine odorants in androstadienone, a human pheromone, that lies in between those with two "Sensitive" alleles and those with two "Insensitive" ones.
Gregor, Jean
 Influence Hardly Smells Androstadienone
Allele Pair People with this allele pair tend to be less sensitive to masculine odorants in androstadienone, a human pheromone, than those with one or two "Sensitive" alleles.
Rosalind

Inheritance & Origins

Sensitive (Global)

Jean inherited one "Sensitive" allele of OR7D4 from Gregor. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

Insensitive (Eurasian)

Jean inherited one "Insensitive" allele of OR7D4 from Rosalind. This allele originates from an ancient Eurasian mutation that occurred thousands of years ago.

Did You Know?

OR7D4 influences smell sensitivity to androstadienone, a human pheromone found in urine, saliva, armpit sweat, and semen. Men have more of it than women do. Androstadienone aids in gender recognition; in particular, it communicates “maleness” to women and homosexual men. In high concentrations, it can have a strong and unpleasant smell. Although it’s used in male fragrances, androstadienone has not been proven to increase sexual attraction.
OR7D4 also influences smell sensitivity to androstenone (not to be confused with androstadienone), a pheromone in certain mammals like boars. Female pigs assume a mating stance upon inhaling androstenone. Androstenone also plays a role in social dominance.
Animal androstenone is variously described as “musky”, “strong”, “urinous”, “sweaty”, “floral”, “sweet”, “vanilla-like”, or “odorless”. In one study, 70% of the women found its smell to be “repellant”.
...

How OR7D4 Works

TThe OR7D4 gene encodes a specific olfactory receptor that interacts with the odorant molecules of androstadienone to trigger perception of this particular compound.
People with two ‘Dry’ alleles of the ABCC11 gene tend to produce less androstadienone and androstenone.
...

OR2J3 Gene
influences smell sensitivity to leaf alcohol, a grassy-scented plant substance

Allele Types:
  • Sensitive
  • Insensitive
 Influence Easily Smells Leaf Alcohol
Allele Pair People with this allele pair tend to be more sensitive to grassy odorants in leaf alcohol than those with one or two "Insensitive" alleles.
Gregor
 Influence Hardly Smells Leaf Alcohol
Allele Pair People with these allele pairs tend to be less sensitive to grassy odorants in leaf alcohol than those with two "Sensitive" alleles.

Jean, Rosalind

Inheritance & Origins

Sensitive (Global)

Jean inherited one "Sensitive" allele of OR2J3 from Gregor. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

Insensitive (African)

Jean inherited one "Insensitive" allele of OR2J3 from Rosalind. This allele originates from an ancient African mutation that occurred thousands of years ago.

Did You Know?

OR2J3 influences smell sensitivity to leaf alcohol, a plant substance described as smelling “green grassy” or like “cut grass”. It’s a key flavor in many foods and beverages including raspberries, broccoli, and white wine. Leaf alcohol is added to fragrances as well as processed food and beverages to give a fresh grassy note. ...

How OR2J3 Works

The OR2J3 gene encodes a specific olfactory receptor that detects chemical similarities to leaf alcohol (cis-3-hexen-1-ol). Leaf alcohol is produced by the linolenic acid of plants when they're wounded; a common example of this is when a freshly mowed lawn gives off a “cut-grass” smell.
The insensitive allele originated from an African mutation that spread into Eurasia. Only about 1/8th of Eurasians carry it versus half of Africans.
...

OR2M7 Gene
a minor influence on smell sensitivity to pungent odorants in asparagusic acid waste

Allele Types:
  • Insensitive
  • Sensitive
 Influence Hardly Smells Asparagusic Acid Waste
Allele Pair People with this allele pair tend to be less sensitive to pungent odorants in asparagusic acid waste than those with one or two "Sensitive" alleles.

 Influence Easily Smells Asparagusic Acid Waste
Allele Pair People with these allele pairs tend to be more sensitive to the pungent odorants in asparagusic acid waste than those with two "Insensitive" alleles. Their urine tends to be smelly to them after eating asparagus.
Gregor
Jean, Rosalind

Inheritance & Origins

Insensitive (Global)

Jean inherited one "Insensitive" allele of OR2M7 from Rosalind. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

Sensitive (Global)

Jean inherited one "Sensitive" allele of OR2M7 from Gregor. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

Did You Know?

After eating asparagus, your urine may give off a pungent smell, unpleasant to most. French novelist Marcel Proust sarcastically wrote how asparagus “transforms my chamber-pot into a flask of perfume.” Benjamin Franklin was aware of asparagus’ transformative powers as well, writing “A few Stems of Asparagus eaten, shall give our Urine a disagreable Odour.” This “Odour” is typically noticeable within an hour of eating asparagus. The OR2M7 gene region influences your ability to perceive this smell. Independent of smell, individuals produce different amounts of the smelly odorants in asparagusic acid waste. ...

How OR2M7 Works

During digestion, asparagus’ sulfurous amino acids are broken down into volatile chemical components that vaporize easily into the air; when you urinate, these airborne components travel to your nose. Like other sulfurous substances, such as garlic, rotten eggs, and skunk spray, the resulting odor is usually perceived as stinky.
The genetic variant for this trait is outside—but near—the DNA that encodes OR2M7. However, it’s likely that OR2M7 is linked to the olfactory receptor that detects asparagus’ smelly byproduct.
For a fun experiment, nosh on some asparagus and then sniff your urine afterwards to see if you detect a pungent smell. This test is absolutely free.
...

ALDH2 Gene
influences body's alcohol processing

Allele Types:
  • Off
  • On
 Influence Skin Normal After Ethanol Patch
 Influence No Facial Flush From Alcohol
Allele Pair People with this allele pair show no skin redness after application of an ethanol patch. They usually do not have a facial flush reaction after drinking alcohol.
Rosalind
 Influence Skin Red After Ethanol Patch
 Influence Facial Flush From Alcohol
Allele Pair People with these allele pairs show skin redness after application of an ethanol patch. They usually have a facial flush reaction after drinking alcohol; reddish blotches may appear on their face, neck, and shoulders.

Gregor, Jean

Inheritance & Origins

Off (Global)

Jean inherited one "Off" allele of ALDH2 from Rosalind. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

On (Asian)

Jean inherited one "On" allele of ALDH2 from Gregor. This allele originates from an ancient Asian mutation that occurred thousands of years ago.

Did You Know?

Facial flush is manifested by the appearance of reddish blotches on the face, neck, shoulders, and sometimes entire body upon consuming alcohol. It's also known as “Alcohol flush” and “Asian flush” due to the much higher presence of the “On” allele in East Asian populations.
Environmental factors such as habitual long-term drinking appear to reduce the severity of a flush reaction. Additional factors include the effect of other genes and how much (and what) you’ve eaten. Ingesting more alcohol increases the severity of the reaction.
Approximately 40% of Japanese have at least one “On” allele. Other East Asian groups such as Koreans and Chinese have at least one “On” allele around 30% of the time. Studies theorize the “On” mutation first surfaced in Asia thousands of years ago. Facial flush is much less common in African and European populations.
...

How ALDH2 Works

ALDH2 encodes an enzyme involved in the processing of alcohol. The presence of an “On” allele interferes with the body’s ability to break down acetaldehyde, a toxic byproduct of alcohol. The accumulation of this byproduct causes blood vessels to dilate and skin to turn red.
For a fun experiment, do a DIY ethanol patch test to confirm whether you have a flush reaction. ALDH2’s influence on whether or not your skin turns red upon application of an ethanol patch is considered MAJOR by Gene Heritage, since this test is not affected by other genetic or environmental factors.
...

LCT Gene Region
a moderate influence on how much lactose is tolerated in adulthood

Allele Types:
  • Off
  • On
 Influence Lactose Intolerance
Allele Pair People with this allele pair usually tolerate less lactose in adulthood than adults with one or two “On” alleles. The influence of this allele pair is present during adulthood and not early childhood.

 Influence Lactose Tolerance
Allele Pair People with these allele pairs usually digest more lactose in adulthood than adults with two "Off" alleles.
Rosalind
Gregor, Jean

Inheritance & Origins

Off (Global)

Jean inherited one "Off" allele of LCT from Gregor. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

On (European)

Jean inherited one "On" allele of LCT from Rosalind. This allele originates from an ancient European mutation that occurred thousands of years ago.

Did You Know?

The LCT gene region influences your tolerance in adulthood to lactose, a sugar commonly found in milk and dairy products.
Different dairy products have varying amounts of lactose. Milk contains a relatively high amount of lactose. Yogurt and cheese have much less of it.
Regardless of our tolerance or intolerance to lactose, as infants we’re still able to digest human milk. Tolerance to lactose is age-dependent, only manifesting itself towards adulthood. It’s also dosage-dependent, so those with lactose intolerance may still be able to consume milk and dairy products in limited amounts.
People with lactose intolerance sometimes take over-the-counter lactase pills to help them digest lactose. Different bacteria in your gut and the amount of food you’ve eaten also influence how much lactose you’re able to tolerate.
...

How LCT Works

LCT encodes lactase, an enzyme in your small intestine that breaks lactose down into simpler sugars called glucose and galactose. When less of this enzyme is present, undigested lactose gets trapped in the gut and is broken down by bacteria, resulting in gas, bloating, cramps, diarrhea, and other symptoms.
The “Off” allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years, whereas the “On” allele is a relatively recent European mutation. European populations tend to be more lactose tolerant than African and Asian ones.
...

ACTN3 Gene
a minor influence on sprinting performance

Allele Types:
  • Off
  • On
 Influence Slower Sprinting
Allele Pair While Olympic sprinters tend to not have this allele pair, the collective influence of many environmental factors, such as training and diet, as well as other genes have a far greater impact on sprinting performance than ACTN3 alone.

 Influence Faster Sprinting
Allele Pair While Olympic sprinters tend to have these allele pairs, the collective influence of many environmental factors, such as training and diet, as well as other genes have a far greater impact on sprinting performance than ACTN3 alone.
Gregor
Jean, Rosalind

Inheritance & Origins

Off (Eurasian)

Jean inherited one "Off" allele of ACTN3 from Rosalind. This allele originates from an ancient Eurasian mutation that occurred thousands of years ago.

On (Global)

Jean inherited one "On" allele of ACTN3 from Gregor. This allele has been widespread globally for tens of thousands of years.

Did You Know?

ACTN3 influences how your muscle fibers use oxygen to generate energy.
Gene Heritage assesses ACTN3 to be an extremely minor influence on sprinting performance. While ACTN3’s influence may be relevant in Olympic sports, where a small advantage can make a big difference, for the vast majority of people there are many other influences on sprinting performance.
Another minor influence on sprinting performance is your height. All else being equal, a shorter person will not run as quickly as a taller one. In addition to ACTN3, hundreds if not thousands of other genes affect sprinting performance.
Many environmental factors influence sprinting performance as well, especially training and diet.
...

How ACTN3 Works

ACTN3 gene encodes the Alpha-actinin protein, which is involved in the composition of skeletal muscle.

For more details visit the ACTN3 gene reference page.

Ready to Get Your Report?

Simply sign up and we'll step you through a quick process. Your report is typically ready in seconds.

Alleles
People normally have two alleles per gene, one from their mother and one from their father.
Ancient Origin
This is where the gene allele originally appeared, many thousands of years ago.
PTC
PTC stands for Phenylthiocarbamide and is a chemical which tastes bitter to most people.
PROP
PROP stands for Propylthiouracil and is a chemical which tastes bitter to most people.
Cruciferous vegetables
Cruciferous vegetables include broccoli, brussel sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, collard greens, kale, and bok choy.
β-ionone
β-ionone is a fragrant organic compound found in violets and rose oil.
Rose Oil
Rose oil is used to add scent to products such as perfumes. It is extracted from roses.
Ethanol Patch
An ethanol patch is a pad with alcohol that is placed on the skin as a test for reddening.
OCA2 Gene
The OCA2 Gene region influences the production of pigmentation, especially in the eyes. They are a major influence on whether eye color is dark or light. For more details visit the OCA2 gene region reference page.
ABCC11 Gene
The ABCC11 gene influences apocrine gland secretion which in turn influences earwax type and armpit odor. For more details visit the ABCC11 gene reference page.
TAS2R38 Gene
The TAS2R38 gene encodes one type of many tens of different types of bitter taste receptor on the tongue. Different substances are detected by these various types of taste receptors. For more details visit the TAS2R38 gene reference page.
TAS2R31 Gene
TAS2R31 and the adjacent TAS2R46 and TAS2R43 genes encode instructions for building three of the more than 20 different types of bitterness taste receptors in the taste buds of your tongue. For more details visit the TAS2R31 gene reference page.
OR5A1 Gene
OR5A1 encodes one of hundreds of different types of olfactory receptors in the nose. A floral fragrant organic compound called β‑ionone — and other chemicals similar to it — trigger the receptor encoded by OR5A1. For more details visit the OR5A1 gene reference page.
OR7D4 Gene
The OR7D4 gene encodes a particular olfactory receptor, a protein that reacts to specific molecules in the nose to trigger a signal in our perception of smell. OR7D4 encodes one of hundreds of different types of olfactory receptors in the nose. A mammalian pheromone called androstenone — and other chemicals similar to it — trigger the receptor encoded by OR7D4. For more details visit the OR7D4 gene reference page.
OR2J3 Gene
The OR2J3 gene encodes a particular olfactory receptor, a protein that reacts to specific molecules in the nose to trigger a signal in our perception of smell. OR2J3 encodes one of hundreds of different types of olfactory receptors in the nose. Leaf alcohol (cis-3-hexen-1-ol) — and other chemicals similar to it — trigger the receptor encoded by OR7D4. For more details visit the OR2J3 gene reference page.
OR2M7 Gene
The OR2M7 gene encodes a particular olfactory receptor, a protein that reacts to specific molecules in the nose to trigger a signal in our perception of smell. OR2M7 encodes one of hundreds of different types of olfactory receptors in the nose. The sulfurous waste byproducts of consuming asparagusic acid, a chemical in asparagus, — and other chemicals similar to it — trigger the receptor encoded by OR2M7. For more details visit the OR2M7 gene reference page.
ALDH2 Gene
The ALDH2 gene encodes an enzyme involved in the processing of alcohol. For more details visit the ALDH2 gene reference page.
LCT Gene
The LCT gene region includes the adjacent LCT and MCM6 genes. The LCT gene encodes lactase, an enzyme produced in the small intestine to help digest lactose, a sugar in dairy. The MCM6 gene acts as a regulator, influencing when LCT produces lactase. For more details visit the LCT gene region reference page.
ACTN3 Gene
The ACTN3 gene encodes the Alpha-actinin protein which is involved in the composition of skeletal muscle. For more details visit the ACTN3 gene reference page.
Raw DNA files from certain DNA collectors do not provide the necessary data to report on some of these genes.
Gene Heritage does not report on traits of clinical importance. This report is not intended for health care purposes or legal proceedings. Talk to your health care provider or a genetic counselor if you seek professional health care assistance.